Posts Tagged ‘international’

Communication outages filled by Indian hams

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

When the powerful Cyclone Hudhud swept into the Bay of Bengal coastal areas of India disaster authorities called on radio amateurs to help out.

National Coordinator for Disaster Communication, Jayu Bhide VU2JAU said,

“In Odissa there are six hams working hard to maintain the communication covering the state. The effect of Hudhud is now reduced and few deaths have been reported.”

The media claimed that at least six deaths had occurred.

That was good news for Odissa because locals feared the bad weather could be a repeat of the very severe storm Phailin in 2013.

Before Hudhud with winds up to 200 km/h made landfall damaging buildings, power systems and the loss of communication in many areas, thousands of people
were evacuated to shelters.

While the worst of strong winds and heavy rain is over, the cyclone can still cause flash flooding and further damage. A full assessment must wait until the storm moves completely on.

Jayu VU2JAU said that active from the Bhuvaneshwar area are Preeti VU3UFX, Rajesh VU3PLP and Samir VU2AOR.

In the Sambalpur area are Dilip VU2DPI who is control of a network of Shantanu VU2SIC and Pawan VU2PGU.

These have been on air using 7140 MHz and have kept their stations open 24 hours a day.

In the Andhra coastal area the total communication is handled by the National Institute of Amateur Radio, and is now under control.

Jayu VU2JAU from the IARU member Amateur Radio Society of India (ARSI), is monitoring emergency traffic from his home QTH in Gwalior.

- Jim Linton VK3PC, Chairman IARU Region 3 Disaster Communications Committee.

IARU Region 1 Conference, Varna-Albena, Bulgaria

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

Below is a message presented by Mr Encho Gospodino, on behalf of European Commissioner Kristalina Georgieva, dealing with International Co-Operation, Humanitarian Air and Crisis response

Dear IARU Conference participants,
Dear radio messengers in times of trouble and hope
Friends, ladies and gentlemen,
It is my pleasure and privilege to address your General Conference. The timing for your gathering could not be more indicative for the world we live in and the challenges we all face today.

The lives of millions of people is impacted by troubling events: conflicts in Africa and the Middle East (and sadly, in Europe); natural disasters all over the world with all the un-predictabilities of the mother Nature and the responsibilities of the human beings for the Climate Change; human waves of migrants and refugees moving from one place to another, and assorted diseases often trailing the disasters and conflicts. In short, this is a world, which does not stop to surprise us every morning when we open the TV screen or a newspaper.

At the same time, the world has never been better connected and wired. Today’s communications are a real miracle once considered a fantasy coming from the novels of Arthur Clarke or Ray Bradbury. Never before, we had this privilege to transmit or exchange information with such accuracy, speed and scope of distribution. And never before so many
people from all corners of the world and all layers of the society had access to this information. The arrival of internet really made our planet a Global village and ever since our live changed forever in the way we deal with information. Politics, diplomacy, journalism, technology, science, research, banking, literally all changed overnight with this powerful instrument.

However, there are moments in life when a good, stable, reliable and independent information tool is the only one we can use to save lives. And this is the one we call simply the RADIO. Imagine a major natural disaster, which knocks down all modern information tools in the affected area: with no electricity, no internet, no telephone and fax connections, not even the old telex machines. No trains and ships moving, no roads to use or airports functioning. Nothing. We know a tragedy has happened, we know many are dead, and even more still alive, but trapped and helpless. And no one can help them as nobody knows what has happened. Because there is no information.

Luckily, there is a last resort: the radio amateurs; the people who are the eyes and the ears of the world in time when all other information channels are silent. “Amateurs” is actually not the right word in this case: these are professional communicators who are listening to the heartbeat of the planet and registering the emotional vibrations of people who may be in danger. In short, you are the last technical miracle, which is independent, reliable information channel, which can transmit an important piece of news from any place in the world, any time, by anyone who knows how to operate this wonderful creature, called radio.

Your advantage is that you are independent. A well-trained radioman with good equipment and ever-charged batteries can be a fantastic link between two villages, two countries or two continents. When organized in a Union, you are a communication superpower in time of total electronic darkness. But the most important part of your equipment is the people you have; the Bravehearts of men and women listening to people who may be in danger and may need help; the professional lifesavers called strangely amateurs, who nevertheless act as volunteers when and where they are needed. In your history, you have many examples of lives being saved because some of your members caught a signal from a village, a region or un-accessible place that someone needs help. We need your skills and services because we will have more and more disasters in the future. The dry statistics reveal troubling trends: during the last 20 – 30 years, the number and the intensity of the natural disasters have increased dramatically. So did the number of people killed or affected. The earthquake in Haiti in 2010 killed 230 000 people alone …. Between 2003 and 2012, some 6700 disasters hit the planet with 2005 being the darkest one – 810 disasters in one year. Typhoons in the Philippines, floods in Pakistan, China or Europe, droughts and famine in Africa, garnished with conflicts, are now almost daily events.

The economic losses from these disasters went up from $ 50 billion to $200 billion a year since the 80s. Every Red Cross volunteer will tell you that during a disaster the most needed and precious live saving element is not food, water or medicines. It is the timely, accurate information that is the most needed. As timely and accurate information saves lives, prevents major tragedies, stops rumours, which create panic and leads to even more casualties. This is how solid information flow becomes the backbone of a successful communication strategy. In short, everything, which you do and helps your societies to organise themselves better, is vital. Local and national authorities count on you as the last bastion of reliable information channel. Your professional skills and your humanitarian duties make you more than radio amateurs; you are truly needed guardians in time of troubles and I hope you will always stay as a pillar of hope and courage for all who are in danger.

Thank you for your noble work. I wish you every success in this Conference.

Kristalina Georgieva

Typhoon Rammasun death toll climbs

Saturday, July 19th, 2014

About 20 people are dead and many left homeless after Typhoon Rammasun, which means ‘thunder of god’, hit the Philippines.

With winds and heavy rain it closed the capital of Manila on Wednesday, before moving north-west out to the South-China Sea.

The Philippine Amateur Radio Association President, Thelma Pascua DU1IVT, activated the Ham Emergency Radio Operator (HERO) network on 7095 kHz. It worked closely with other responding agencies.

The storm on Tuesday and Wednesday resulted in the evacuation of thousands of people, closed businesses, schools, 60 flights were cancelled and ferry traffic halted.

The eye of Typhoon Rammasun passed to the south of Manila after moving through the eastern islands of the archipelago to bring down trees and power lines, caused electrocutions and blackouts.

Thelma DU1IVT reported that in Manila she had winds of 150-185kph for hours. At least 40 provinces and cities were under a storm alert.

The government took every precaution to minimise the deaths. Super Typhoon Haiyan last November killed at least at least 6,300 people and 1,000 are still missing.

About 20 storms reach the Philippines each year making it one of the world’s most disaster-prone areas.

- Jim Linton VK3PC, Chairman IARU Region 3 Disaster Communications Committee.

China earthquake, update #3

Monday, April 22nd, 2013

The rescue and relief efforts after Saturday’s southwest China Ya’an earthquake is continuing with the number of lives lost officially at 188 people, 25 are missing and 11,460 injured.

While radio amateurs continue to help with relief efforts, Fan Bin BA1RB says that public communication is back to normal in the disaster area.

He said the CRSA/CRAC no longer required 3855kHz, 7050kHz and 14270kHz as emergency communication frequencies. It expressed thanks for the support from IARU member societies and others during the disaster.

It rained in the earthquake area last night. Effective traffic control has been very important to transport tents, water, foods and medicines into the area.

The rural communities around Ya’an city are along the same seismic fault where the Great Sichuan Earthquake killed more than 90,000 people five years ago, in one of China’s worst natural disasters.

The latest earthquake on Saturday left tens of thousands of people in tents or cars, unable to return home or too afraid to go back as aftershocks continued.

Badly hit Lushan County is now a large refugee camp, with tents set up and volunteers providing meals.

(Jim Linton VK3PC, Chairman of the IARU Region 3 Disaster Communications Committee with help of Fin Ban BA1RB)

China Earthquake, update #2

Sunday, April 21st, 2013

The earthquake has killed 179 people and injured 6986. Hundreds of amateur radio operators went to Ya’an helping disaster relief.

The disaster happened as the Global Simulated Emergency Test was underway headed in China by station BY3CQ and others – BG8EIU, BG8FCK, BG8DE, BG8FPB, BY8DX, BH8AHU, BA8IK and BG8EBB – who are now either helping on HF, VHF or in the disaster area.

Fan Bin BA1RB contacted this morning Liu Hu BD8AAA who is in the epicentre at Lushan county.

The following updates are available:
1. Public communication is normal in Ya’an and Lushan, the UHF and VHF repeaters work fine to provide effective communication. While in some remote rural areas, the communication is still needed to be established. Amateur Radio teams are actively helping build up the communications.

2. The government has more experiences to organise the disaster relief, amateur radio operators were organised and provided help based on government needs.

3. Because suddenly there are too many vehicles coming into Ya’an city and Lushan county, the transportation traffic condition is severe. There are 8 amateur radio teams, more than 200 amateur radio operators helping local transportation department to relieve traffic congestion.

The request to keep the HF frequencies of 3855kHz, 7050kHz and 14270kHz clear for disaster traffic remains.

The Sichuan amateur radio association took immediate action with BA8DX (not BD8DX as earlier report) and BD8AAA leading a team heading to the disaster area.

73 de BA1RB / Fanbin

China Earthquake.

Saturday, April 20th, 2013

Today 8:02am, a 7.0 scale earthquake hit Ya’an city, Sichuan province in China. The epicenter was near Lushan County. As of 17:24 today, 113 persons were killed and more than 2,000 were injured.

After the disaster, The Sichuan amateur radio association took immediate actions, BD8DX and BD8AAA lead team heading to disaster area providing emergency communication services.

The local amateur radio repeater works fine, and provided emergency communication for the public. BG8FUW in Lushan county, BG8EYD in Ya\’an city help providing amateur radio emergency communication.

Some amateur radio operators watches on HF or went to disaster area to help disaster relief.

Today is also the GlobalSet emergency simulation test second session. China HQ station BY3CQ made a QSO with BG8DE, who was on the way to the earthquake area to help disaster relief.

CRSA / CRAC call for all amateur radio operators, to avoid 3855KHZ, 7050KHZ and 14270KHZ on short wave for possible interference on disaster relief use.

Argentina Flooding.

Friday, April 5th, 2013

The following information has been received from Jorge, LU1AS about the amateur radio response to the severe flooding in Buenos Aires and La Plata in Argentina.

The flooding rains have been very strong in the city of Buenos Aires and surrounding areas, and in the city of La Plata, which is the capital of the Province of Buenos Aires, located 60 kilometers south of the City of Buenos Aires. So far 57 people have died, 51 of them in La Plata.

The frequencies that are being used on 40 meters are 7070 and 7120, in addition to VHF and UHF repeaters kept on alert for the radio club La Plata, LU8DZE.
There are also a lot of communication activity through Facebook Emergenciaslu Amateur group, maintained by the sera, Amateur Radio Emergency Service of Argentina.

Tasmanian bushfire disaster

Saturday, January 5th, 2013

WICEN Tasmania (South), assisted by other trained southern region radio amateurs, is providing 24 hour support for firefighting activities as several fires continue to burn.

At least 100 properties have been destroyed and thousands of people are left stranded. Towns on the devastated Tasman Peninsula in the state’s south-east are cut off and only accessible via sea.

WICEN Tasmania (South) Secretary, Roger Nichols VK7ARN said teams of two radio operators for the Incident Management Team based at Tasmania Fire Service Cambridge, are concerned primarily with two of the major fires.

“These are fires on the Tasman Peninsula and in the Derwent Valley. Both of these and several others are still fast moving at this time,” said Roger VK7ARN.

Significant property loss has already occurred, especially in the Tasman Peninsula fire. There are 60 fire units in the field on these fires, being almost half of 130 currently actively deployed across Tasmania.

He said, “Radio operator needs and deployments are under constant review as the situation develops. The Tasmania Fire Service 80MHz network is being used, involving standard procedures and Prowords.”

Roger VK7ARN said 18 radio amateurs recently attended an introductory training course run by the Tasmania Fire Service in preparation for such an eventuality, though the size and scope of the current operations is way beyond previous activations.

He said radio operator teams normally include at least one operator with previous fire experience and training. It may be that more amateur resources will be required, at least to assist with log keeping and message recording. These may include deployments to other control points closer to the firegrounds.

Overnight a massive sea rescue operation moved more than 1,000 people trapped by the Tasman Peninsula fires to safety in Hobart, 50 kilometres away. Thousands of people, including 700 tourists at historic Port Arthur, remain stranded.

(Jim Linton VK3PC, Chair of the IARU Region 3, Disaster Communications Committee)

Tropical Storm Quinta

Thursday, December 27th, 2012

Received from Greg Mossop, G0DUB IARU Region 1 Emergency Communications Co-Ordinator:

Another storm disaster ends in the Philippines

Spare a thought for those who spent a nervous, very wet and windy Christmas period as Tropical Storm Quinta went through the south of the Philippines, in areas trying to recover from Tyhoon Bopha earlier in the month.

Activated during the storm was the Philippines Amateur Radio Association emergency net on 7.095 MHz and VHF, to handle emergency and welfare traffic.

A request to keep the HF frequency clear was issued by PARA’s Vice Chief Operating Officer, Ramon J. Anquilan DU1UGZ. The emergency had passed and he expressed many thanks on behalf of PARA for use of the frequency.

Among those involved in the emergency were members of the PARA-affiliated club, The District 5 Radio Amateur Network DX5RAN.

They were kept busy coordinating much needed pre-emptive evacuations in Tacloban City and elsewhere alongside the Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council. Other radio amateurs were also involved in the overall emergency.

Landslides occurred in the Visayas, Southern Leyte and Eastern Samar areas. There were more than 5,800 ferry passengers stranded with fishermen told not to venture out.

The archipelago has numerous severe weather events each year. Typhoon Bopha which made landfall over Mindanao on December the 2nd ripped through the southern provinces killing 1,067 people, leaving hundreds missing and many more homeless.

(Jim Linton VK3PC, Chairman IARU Region 3 Disaster Communications Committee, with Ramon J. Anquilan DU1UGZ, PARA Vice Chief Operating Officer)

Typhoon Quinta

Tuesday, December 25th, 2012

Received from Greg Mossop, G0DUB IARU Region 1 Emergency Communications Co-Ordinator:

The Philippine Amateur Radio Association (PARA) Inc. has activated its emergency net to deal with whatever contingencies that may arise due to typhoon Quinta making landfall by tomorrow Dec 26. As of the moment the typhoon is situated some 60 kilometers east of Guiuian Eastern Samar. It packs a 65 to 90 kph gustiness near the center.

Please advise all operators to stand clear from the calling frequency of 7.095 MHz plus minus QRM. We will be using the frequency until we stand down from our emergency net and return to normal operations.

First off the information thread, Nathan Eamiguel, DU5AOK, has relayed that the City of Tacloban has ordered a forced preemptive evacuation of Barangay Palanog and other low-lying areas in Tacloban City as of 5:20 PM local time.

Thank you and Merry Christmas.

Ramon J. Anquilan, DU1UG
Vice COO, PARA